Don't know whether to wind my bum or wipe my watch

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Joined: 22 Jan 2011
Don't know whether to wind my bum or wipe my watch

Ok, How about this.

 

I have a new Panasonic 65 inch plasma TV  TC-P65S2 (2010) sitting in its box. It's not 3-D. I have enough to worry about without having to keep up with 2-4 pairs of silly eye glasses.

 

It's still in the box because I'm keeping my perfectly good ($2300 4 years ago) Panasonic PT-61LCX65 60 inch projection TV mounted on its, ($500 extra)  grey matching plastic base and keeping in hooked up for anyone who's interested in buying it to see it works and looks great; while my add on Craigs list for it going at $500 goes un-noticed.

Step one: How does a A/V receiver make sound for all my peripherals? By peripherals I'm talking about my xbox, blu-ray player, and HTCP.

1. Cable from Time Warner comes in my house and I screw the female threaded adapter onto Ceton InfiniTV4 lead. What next?

I have a video card with a HDMI output. Where do I run this HDMI outlet into my Sony STD-DH810 receiver? HDMI is video and sound so why do I need the sound card on my motherboard? Just mount it in an empty PCI or in the case of my MSI Eclipse mobo it's already mounted. What do I do with the output holes on the sound card (ignore them)? My video card (Radeon) HD6770 has an HDMI output. Does the video card integrate itself with my installed sound card and suck everything it needs from its circuitry and send it out with the video through the single HDMI card on the Radeon?

And where does the other end of the HDMI cord (from the radeon) go in the back of my Sony receiver? TV in? Aux in? DVD in? refrigerator in?

I've been reading green button & lost remote. I've read the beginners guides. I still don't know how to run all my stuff through the receiver.

Aaron Ledger's picture
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Joined: 6 Aug 2010

The AVR is capable of switching your input sources to a single output cable to your display. At the same time, it also processes the incoming audio signal and amplifies the signal for your connected speakers.

The video card you have is capable of sending both audio and video to your AVR via HDMI. You should see the default audio device present in the Windows sound configuration. You'll want to select the HDMI audio device as your default sound device.

The sound card on your motherboard provides additional options such as analog audio output and S/PDIF digital audio. You don't need to worry about these if using HDMI for audio.

For connection to your receiver, you can connect to any of the input sources. It doesn't matter if it is named "TV in", "Aux in", "DVD in". Select the one you want and choose inputs for your other sources as well. You will then choose the source on your receiver for the one you want to listen to through your speakers and watch video on your display.

I hope this makes sense for you. If not, feel free to let us know what you want explained.

Senior Editor | @swoon_

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Joined: 22 Jan 2011

Thanks, that does make sense and it was what I was hoping. Does the video card get the HD sound from the sound card or an embedded chip on the MB?

Aaron Ledger's picture
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Joined: 6 Aug 2010

hogbuoy wrote:

Thanks, that does make sense and it was what I was hoping. Does the video card get the HD sound from the sound card or an embedded chip on the MB?

 

If you have content with HD audio, you have two choices.

1. Decode the audio using software codec (e.g. Blu-ray playback software deocdes). The audio is then sent in an uncompressed format (called LPCM) to the AVR via HDMI.

2. "Bitstream" the HD Audio via HDMI. It is called bitstream because the compressed bitstream is sent to the AVR exactly as it was received. Bitstreaming requires something called a Protected Audio Path (PAP). Your AMD graphics card supports PAP, so this option is also available to you.

Senior Editor | @swoon_

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Joined: 22 Jan 2011

Is there a consensus on the best universal remote that will control a sony AV receiver, xbox WMC extender, and a HTPC? OR better yet what is your opinion?

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Joined: 3 Oct 2006

The Logitech remotes are the best for the money in my opinion. They are easy to setup and once you play with the settings, pic and sound button setups you can get them to replace all the remotes with one. Backlit keys are great.

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